Mayia and Aden Brunet play with a cat they found on Isle de Jean Charles. In the 1950's, there were more than 80 families on the island. Today there are only 20-30 families left on the island.

A group of fishermen and women who live on the island of Isle de Jean Charles, cast nets into the water near the Island Road at the beginning of the Island. The only way to reach the island by land is through a 2 mile long, narrow road. The road is often flooded when there are strong southern winds and high tides.

Celebrating in the lake after the boat blessing parade.

Mayia and Aden Brunet play with a cat they found on Isle de Jean Charles. In the 1950's, there were more than 80 families on the island. Today there are only 20-30 families left on the island.

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In the front line of Louisiana coastal erosion struggle, a native American community who fished , hunt , trapped and farmed the land for decades is now facing the loss of it's lands. The loss caused due to a combination of rising sea levels, oil exploration and devastating hurricanes. In the 1950's there were more than 80 families on Isle de Jean Charles but today there are only 20-30 families left. "things don't look the same like they did when I was a kid. We used to play behind the house, it was all land . but know we can only swim there". says Mel Guidery born and raised in Pointe Aux Chenne while standing on a levee that protects his property from flooding.